Posts Tagged ‘north carolina’

In the Courts

Fighting crime can’t be easy, but deputizing religious groups to do the job of police officers definitely isn’t the answer.

Fortunately, that shouldn’t be happening in North Carolina, thanks to a unanimous state appellate court decision yesterday. In State of North Carolina v. Yencer, a three-judge panel ruled that it is an unconstitutional “government entanglement with religion” to allow […] Read More

Church Politicking

Some residents of Henderson County, N.C., seem determined to fight unnecessary battles.

According to news reports, the Henderson County Commission held a meeting last night to hear from the community and take a final vote on whether its monthly meetings should continue to open with sectarian invocations.

The commissioners wanted to address the issue in light of a federal […] Read More

Government-Sponsored Religion, Religion in Public Life

The issue of prayer before government meetings continues to generate controversy around the country. Yesterday I mentioned a flap in Sevier County, Tenn., where members of the Board of Commissioners routinely open their meetings with the Lord’s Prayer.

Community discord over official prayer is also erupting in Henderson County, N.C., where members of the county commission usually open […] Read More

Government-Sponsored Religion, In the Courts, Religion and politics, Religion in Public Life

Part of my job here at Americans United is to correspond with the general public. Frequently I find myself engaged in answering the most basic of questions. I’m often explaining the significance of Thomas Jefferson’s letter to the Danbury Baptists wherein he coined the phrase “wall of separation between church and state.”

I also remind inquiring citizens that the […] Read More

Religious School Vouchers

As a kid I attended a private religious school for eight years. In the seventh grade, a new student joined our class.

Molly was – how shall I say this? – a “problem child.” She smoked cigarettes, frequently cut class, cussed like a longshoreman and ran with a rough crowd. Our school was known for its strict discipline (not to […] Read More

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