Archive for the ‘The U.S. Supreme Court’ Category

Government-Sponsored Religion, Religious Symbols on Public Property, The U.S. Supreme Court

Today, the U.S. Supreme Court issued a ruling in a religious symbol dispute that is almost certain to leave a Latin cross standing in a public park in California.

The court was split 5-4, with Justice Anthony Kennedy writing the plurality opinion. Justices Samuel Alito, Clarence Thomas, John Roberts and Antonin Scalia backed the decision, while Justices John Paul […] Read More

The U.S. Supreme Court

This morning, when I headed over to the U.S. Supreme Court to hear oral arguments in Christian Legal Society v. Martinez, I didn’t see Newt Gingrich in attendance.

I was hoping the former House speaker would be there — not because I’m a fan, but because I thought he could have learned something. Gingrich got the facts of the case […] Read More

Religion in Public Schools, The U.S. Supreme Court, This Day in History

Sixty-two years ago today, the U.S. Supreme Court held that “released time,” a program whereby public schools set aside class time for on-campus religious instruction, violated the constitutional separation between church and state.

The 1948 decision, McCollum v. Board of Education, was a landmark in application of the First Amendment’s Establishment Clause to church-state violations occurring in the public schools. […] Read More

Marriage & Sexuality, Religion and politics, Religion in Public Schools, Religious Right Research, The U.S. Supreme Court, This Day in History

Note: Today is the federal observance of Dr. Martin Luther King’s birthday. This blog post is a re-publication on an item that originally appeared on Jan. 13, 2006.

Today marks the federal observance of Dr. Martin Luther King’s birthday. Since his tragic assassination on April 4, 1968, King’s memory has been pressed into service in highly unusual ways that King […] Read More

Religion and politics, The U.S. Supreme Court

The U.S. Supreme Court is back in session today, which means Justice Sonia Sotomayor has taken her seat on the bench for the first time.

Yesterday morning was another first for the junior justice. She attended the Red Mass at the Cathedral of St. Matthew the Apostle as a VIP guest.

Five other justices sat with her in front […] Read More

Evolution & Creationism, Government-Sponsored Religion, In the Courts, Religion in Public Life, The U.S. Supreme Court

The U.S. Supreme Court is gearing up to come back into session Oct. 5, and just in time for that, Justice Antonin Scalia has decided to pop off in the media about how much he hates church-state separation – again!

In what is billed as an “Historic Exclusive Interview” in the Brooklyn-based Orthodox   Jewish newspaper Hamodia, Scalia attacks […] Read More

Government-Sponsored Religion, In the Courts, Religion in the Military, Religious Symbols on Public Property, The U.S. Supreme Court

Yesterday afternoon, the U.S. Senate voted to confirm Sonia Sotomayor for a seat on the U.S. Supreme Court, the third woman and the first Latina to ever serve as a justice.

It’s a historical milestone, and Americans United is looking forward to watching the new justice in action, particularly when it comes to church-state issues.

As we have mentioned […] Read More

Judicial Nominations, The U.S. Supreme Court

As it turns out, we didn’t have to wait too long for a question assessing Judge Sonia Sotomayor’s thoughts on religious liberty.

Yesterday afternoon, as the Senate confirmation hearings continued, Sen. Benjamin Cardin (D-Md.) asked Sotomayor her views on freedom of religion, which he called “one of the basic principles of our Constitution.”

Cardin brought up one of Supreme […] Read More

In the Courts, The U.S. Supreme Court

As you may have noticed, Judge Sonia Sotomayor’s Senate confirmation hearings continue today.

We’ve heard a lot of griping about her “wise Latina” remark and her decision in the Ricci case, as well as witnessed outbursts from anti-abortionist protestors.

But to our knowledge, we have yet to hear anyone ask her about her views on church and state issues. […] Read More

Church-State Milestones, The U.S. Supreme Court, This Day in History

I grew up in Ohio in late ’80s through the ’90s. My parents, sisters and I were one of the few South Asian families in town, and I was one of only two Hindu students in my graduating class of nearly 350 students.

Fortunately for me, it mattered little that I was Hindu and most of my classmates were Christian. […] Read More

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